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Okay, gee mee 4 gees

budascuda

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Well I thought it was interesting that some people think that just because it's for fun, you should loose money on your hobbies or interests. If that was true, the gentleman who sold his hemi cuda on BJ for 3.5 million must have been shocked out of his socks to see the 3.5 mill bid. (he was not, in fact he held out and rejected 3.2 offer). Or to pay $4000 for a nos cuda grill knowing that it will LOWER the price of your cuda! But since it was for hobby, it don't matter that it was costly, it was fun! Some folk's HOBBY is to do something interesting AND make money at it, they restore a car to a great condition, they will do things right in the best way they can, they even try to buy nos and keep the car American and not partly made in "overseas"( it gives me the chills to think of the type of vehicles people drove around in "overseas" in the 70s) .To not compromise for the sake of a "budget". Those people are dedicated and serious about their hobbies and expect to be rewarded for their hard work , one can't talk down to them because they are respectful of the task they have taken on. For that dedication they should not see a loss. It's my humble opinion that it is for these reasons and for those people that outrageous prices are demanded and paid for some nos parts,knowing fully well by both parties that there will be a reward and not a loss. Hopefully!!!!!!
 

DetMatt1

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I'm sorry but I understand very little about what you wrote including the title. Was it just a rant of sorts??
 

budascuda

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Sorry about the confusion , I was reading a post by a member about the deppreciating value of challengers listed by some auction hose. he had a reply that said "do it as a hobby and don't expect to get your money back". Meanwhile somebody is asking $ 4000 for a nos grill . the guy who is asking the price and the guy who will eventually pay for it don't believe in loosing money to their hobbies. And why should they?. Oh and the title, we'll that is like a masked bandit asking you to hand over $4000 ( in gangster movies one thousand or a grand is abbreviated by a "G" . 4000, 4 grand, 4 gees all the same. And yes It IS a rant, it is about the people who don't appreciate the cost of a restorations and those who ask outrageous prices.
 

DetMatt1

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I know what a G is, I geuss I just never saw it spelled that way especially proceeded by gee mee which I'm assuming now is give me. I'm clear now, thanks!
 

challenger6pak

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There are exceptions. A loss in general is the rule. The way to make the most money with these cars was to buy them in the 70s and 80s and sell them now. For instance; I have a 8G invested in a 70 440+6 Challenger and a 70 440+6 Cuda. I can make money on them. I have also owned them for over 30 years. If you were to buy one of these from me at its' value and then give it a total restoration you would not make money; but I would.
 

Steve340

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For me it is not about making money or losing money.
I enjoy driving my cars, most of the friends I have are in to cars.
Enjoy a car for what it really is, something to get from A to B in and the money will be well spent.
 

seneca

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I don't know exactly how much I've spent on my Cuda in the 45 years I've owned it ( I think it would be in that column on a balance sheet labeled " shitload") but then I don't really care. It has been a world of fun and a neat source of meeting other great folks that share the same interests. The car will be kept until I can no longer push in the clutch and row through the gears ( or I drop dead ) and then it can be sold and the money invested for things like nursing homes and Depends. If not losing money is an important criteria, this is probably not the hobby you should be in.
 

budascuda

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There are exceptions. A loss in general is the rule. The way to make the most money with these cars was to buy them in the 70s and 80s and sell them now. For instance; I have a 8G invested in a 70 440+6 Challenger and a 70 440+6 Cuda. I can make money on them. I have also owned them for over 30 years. If you were to buy one of these from me at its' value and then give it a total restoration you would not make money; but I would.
Okay , do they need a restoration in the first place,
The selling price must reflect the condition. If they need total restoration , the profit is realized between the before and after condition
There are exceptions. A loss in general is the rule. The way to make the most money with these cars was to buy them in the 70s and 80s and sell them now. For instance; I have a 8G invested in a 70 440+6 Challenger and a 70 440+6 Cuda. I can make money on them. I have also owned them for over 30 years. If you were to buy one of these from me at its' value and then give it a total restoration you would not make money; but I would.
I don't know exactly how much I've spent on my Cuda in the 45 years I've owned it ( I think it would be in that column on a balance sheet labeled " shitload") but then I don't really care. It has been a world of fun and a neat source of meeting other great folks that share the same interests. The car will be kept until I can no longer push in the clutch and row through the gears ( or I drop dead ) and then it can be sold and the money invested for things like nursing homes and Depends. If not losing money is an important criteria, this is probably not the hobby you should be in.
 

budascuda

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I don't know exactly how much I've spent on my Cuda in the 45 years I've owned it ( I think it would be in that column on a balance sheet labeled " shitload") but then I don't really care. It has been a world of fun and a neat source of meeting other great folks that share the same interests. The car will be kept until I can no longer push in the clutch and row through the gears ( or I drop dead ) and then it can be sold and the money invested for things like nursing homes and Depends. If not losing money is an important criteria, this is probably not the hobby you should be in.
It works fine for me. thank god there is exceptions to the rule
when I left my folks back home, they told me son, paying 80 k for a car that needs 80 k worth of work so you can sell it for 80k, is considered dumb in the city , so don't you do it. If you play within your game, you do O right and then some. The trick is to know that for any thing exquisite, there is a select crowd.
 

budascuda

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For me it is not about making money or losing money.
I enjoy driving my cars, most of the friends I have are in to cars.
Enjoy a car for what it really is, something to get from A to B in and the money will be well spent.
What you said sir, is Devine.
 

challenger6pak

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Okay , do they need a restoration in the first place,
The selling price must reflect the condition. If they need total restoration , the profit is realized between the before and after condition

I have done this as a living for many many years. 9 times out of 10 the only one who sees the profit is the shop if you do a real full restoration.
 

budascuda

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You hit that out the park! %100 right.
I stopped trusting shops to do any thing on any of my cars after I bought my first challenger in 1986. I am never satisfied with getting charged shop rate but having a kid apprentice or a clown to do the work. I don't let those people who work for dismal wages and are wet behind the ears and a wrench sticking out of their back pocket to go near my car or even worst yet, go inside . Except the machining required on my engines ( and the owner does the old engines himself when he comes in 2 days a week), I do the assembly with my son and take time doing it. ( for instance I like to stand up the block and lower the cam in the block vertically by a little pully suspended over the work bench, that allows me to gradually and carefully lower the cam.
You don't get that in too many places.)
 

challenger6pak

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You have obviously not gone to a real good restoration shop. If you can do it yourself, it is the way to go.
 

340challconvert

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It has all been said here already:
Restoring a car is expensive, parts and labor are exorbitant.
The more you can do yourself, you save on labor. What you pay someone to do for you is not always the best that can be done.

Hobby's cost money. Working and driving our cars is a hobby. Hobby's are not always profitable.
Enjoy driving the car and know that in most cases you will not get back all that you spend.
In some rarefied cases, you get a very desireable/rare car that is worth putting some work and money into, you could make money.

The market and what sells, changes. The trends change.
Purest's might not buy a car that is not original. These cars are restored to the max with date coded parts: they sell for high prices
People seeking a reasonable priced car might look at a clone or modified car and be happy with it.(built with someone else's money) Buyer makes out.
Some people buy a car, restore/restomod it with a hemi and are able to sell high at actions at a profitable price.
If you bought your cars years ago at a good price and kept the car all the years; you are lucky. And it still costs a fortune to put the car together.

People now seem more willing to pay a higher price for a car without the original engine, but correctly date coded. This seems to be more acceptable now.

Most of us will overspend on what the car is worth and just enjoy the experience of driving it (I am in this category)

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